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Iowa Farm Outlook Newsletter

ISU Extension and Outreach Economics

 

 

 

 

Recent rains, floods and excess water could mean changes to your management and grazing practices, as well as current and future feed supplies. Check out our list of flood-related resources. Also, check out our new calving management section.

In the beef industry, calving management is critical to production and profitability of the cow herd. Knowing how to prepare, what to do and not do, and when to take action all are critical aspects of correctly managing calving in your herd. That’s why the Iowa Beef Center and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach developed the Calving Management Manual, now available on the IBC website.

The 2019 Dairy Beef Short Course, held in conjunction with the Central Plains Dairy Expo, will focus on the importance and value of dairy beef bull calves in today's marketplace. As dairy and beef producers continue to experience economic struggles, increasing the value of bull calves can add value for dairymen, feeders and processors is vital. Iowa State University dairy specialist Fred Hall said this year's short course will provide a wealth of information for attendees. It's set for Tuesday, March 26 in rooms 1 and 2 at the Denny Sanford Premier Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and registration is now open.

Due to severe weather, these BQA certification sessions are postponed:

  • BQA training originally scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 29 at the Lucas County Extension Office has been rescheduled for next Tuesday evening, Feb. 5.  The meeting will be held at the Lucas County Extension office from 6:30 p.m. to approximately 8:30 p.m.  To learn more or to register, please call the Lucas County Extension Office at 641-774-2016. 
  • The Jan. 30 BQA training in DeWitt is now postponed to Feb. 6, 6-8 p.m. at the Clinton County Fairgrounds. Any questions, contact Denise Schwab at 319-721-9624.
  • Jan. 30 session at Hamilton County Extension Office, Webster City, is cancelled. That office also is closed Jan. 29-30. Questions: contact Russ Euken.

"Foreign Animal Disease Preparedness: What to expect and How to prepare" workshops for cattle, pig, sheep and goat producers, extension personnel and veterinarians are scheduled at five Iowa locations, from Feb. 7 to March 12. All are hosted by Iowa Department of Ag and Land Stewardship and Center for Food Security and Public Health at Iowa State University, provided at no cost and include lunch. Attendees at these interactive workshops (8:30 to 3:30 p.m.) will learn what to expect if Foot and Mouth Disease or African Swine Fever is found in the U.S., how long movement could stop and the requirements to move animals once movement restarts, how to protect their animals from diseases, and the use of daily health monitoring strategies in an outbreak. More details on the workshop flyer. Preregister by completing this online form or calling 515-281-5321.

Iowa is home to 4.2 percent of the United States’ beef cattle inventory, the seventh-largest number of any state in the country. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach beef specialist Denise Schwab said a project conducted through the Iowa Beef Center worked with 28 producers to characterize three production management systems. A series of meetings in February will share the results of the project and tour some cooperator operations.

 

 

News Archives

Columns

Dan Loy in The Cattleman Magazine

Dan Loy, Iowa Beef Center director, writes this monthly column featured in Iowa Cattleman Magazine.

March 2019

What exactly do we mean by calving under roof?

There have been many excellent conferences and field days in recent years with the focus on calving under roof. So what is this really all about? The literal understanding of calving under a roof means putting a cow or heifer in a barn to calve. Pretty much anyone in Iowa who has ever calved in January or February likely does or has done that.

Read the rest of this column.

Katy Lippolis -- Angus JournalKaty Lippolis, assistant professor of animal science at Iowa State University, writes a regular "By Design" column for Angus Journal.

March 2019

Calving Facilities

As we get closer to calving season, it’s time to make sure our facilities are prepared. In many instances, deciding to calve in a barn can be advantageous in many ways. Newborn calves have difficulty maintaining body temperature, an calving in cold and/or muddy conditions can lead to significant sickness and mortality. After difficult births, calves are often weak for several days and require additional care to ensure healthy recovery.

Read more.